Teach with Kahoot!: Go beyond review with the Blind Kahoot

teach with kahoot

Teachers all over the world use Kahoot! for formative assessment and to review content with students. And why wouldn’t they? Kahoot! (getkahoot.com) is a fun gameshow-style assessment activity. There are tons of creative ways to review and assess with it. Kahoot! lets students answer questions with their own device. It has music and a leaderboard, […]

15 building blocks to a meaningful #ISTE17 (or any conference)

Craft your ISTE experience like you'd make a creation out of LEGOs. Here are some ideas for making it meaningful. (Icons via jon trillana via TheNounProject.com)

When you go to a conference — even for a single day — you’re investing hours of your life into the experience. And if that’s the case, it’s always best when you get a good return on the time investment. The ISTE (International Society for Technology in Education) Conference (iste.org/conference) takes place every summer. It’s […]

Remixing traditional lessons with tech: a framework you can use

Trying to "tech up" our old lessons may not have the impact we hope. But we can use traditional lessons to inspire new teaching. Here's a way. (Public domain image via Pixabay.com)

Many times, teachers try to bring technology into the classroom by “teching up” their old lessons. They hope that they’ll get big, lasting change from a little bit of tech fairy dust. Many times, it doesn’t change the overall learning experience much — and sometimes detracts from it. To really get the most out of […]

10 strategies for lightning-quick feedback students can REALLY use

Students crave feedback, but it has to be timely to matter. Here are some strategies for feedback students will WANT to read. (Wikimedia / Carla OLPC Wiki / CC BY-SA 3.0)

Using homework assignments to give feedback is pokey. Inefficient. Slow. Think about the length of the feedback loop for traditional homework assignments: Teacher assigns homework to students. Students take it home (maybe) and work on it (maybe). Students turn it in the next day. Teacher grades and provides comments that night (if not completely swamped […]

The Meaningful Tech Workshop

By Ditch That Textbook

Find this page at: DitchThatTextbook.com/tech

meaningful tech workshop image

Restaurants near Love Field (and the hotel): click here


Getting started

The Voice of the Active Learner: Education from a Digital Native’s Perspective (YouTube link)

voice active learner

MAKE CREATORS, NOT CONSUMERS.

Animation. This is a great hack (i.e. non-traditional use) of Google Slides that could take some time to complete but yield amazing results. Check out this video, where the creators made an impressive animation with 450 slides in a Google Slides presentation just by clicking through the slides quickly.

Interactive posters. Google Drawings are great for bringing images, text and shapes together. Those elements combine for a great digital poster. But these digital posters are way better than a regular one made of poster board. Various elements in the poster can be clicked, delivering webpages and other online content to viewers.

Make video. These tools will help students use their creativity to make and share good-looking video.

Photo comic strips. Take photos of students using a webcam and add them to a Google Drawing. Add speech bubbles to the photos. Then save those images and add each one to a different slide in a Google Slides presentation. Here’s a Google Site about Comics with Google Tools and Creativity Games for examples and more details.

Graphic organizers. Drawings gives users a blank canvas where they can add text, shapes, lines, etc. When done, they can save their work as image files or PDF files and can add those images to documents, slides and spreadsheets. It’s a perfect medium for creating graphic organizers. I’ve created 15 of them that can be copied, saved, changed, tweaked or completely redone to fit your needs and your students’ needs.

COLLABORATE.

Shared presentations. Create a presentation with one slide per student and give students permission to edit it. Then assign an activity — some quick Internet research, a writing prompt, an image search to find an example, etc. When they’re done, show the presentation on a projector. It’s student work instantly on display.

For more fun, creative uses of Google Apps, go to:

MAKE CLASS ENGAGING!

Use free technology tools and engagement hooks from “Teach Like a PIRATE” to create exciting learning opportunities your students won’t want to miss!

Go to: DitchThatTextbook.com/pirate to get your copy of Matt’s free ebook, “The Digital PIRATE” and to see examples of several of the activities that YOU can use in your classroom.

QUICK FOCUS: GET NEW IDEAS

Using social media is a great way to gather new ideas and connect with other educators like you. Using Twitter professionally as an educator has had the greatest impact on my teaching of anything in my career!

My Twitter for Teachers guide: DitchThatTextbook.com/twitter

Some social media resources to check out:

SHORTEN THE FEEDBACK LOOP.

If we want students to practice new skills with homework, the feedback loop is pretty long … often two days or more from assigning to returning to students. Shorten the feedback loop with some of these great tools to assess your students. Plus, they’re a lot of fun! Go to: DitchThatTextbook.com/gameshow

CONNECT TO THE WORLD.

The tools

Google Hangouts: hangouts.google.com
Skype: skype.com
Facetime (iPad, iPhone)

Mystery location calls

Finding video chat partners

Other resources

TAKE STUDENTS THERE.

Maps and mapping tools can reach so many content areas and grade levels:

  • Distances and scale in math
  • Geography in social studies
  • Locations of settings of literature in English
  • Physical science (environment, weather, etc.)
  • Culture in world languages

These mapping tools can take students places the bus can’t. Go to: DitchThatTextbook.com/mapping

THE ESSENTIAL TECH TOOLKIT FOR TEACHERS

  1. Google Apps / G Suite (drive.google.com)
  2. Stackup (stackup.net)
  3. Formative (goformative.com)
  4. Remind (remind.com)
  5. Twitter (twitter.com)
  6. Skype (skype.com) and Google Hangouts (hangouts.google.com)
  7. Quizizz (quizizz.com), Kahoot! (getkahoot.com) and Quizlet Live (quizlet.com/live)

CONCLUSION: PUT IT ALL TOGETHER.

Let’s take some time to process what we’ve learned and thought about today. (video)

Plus:

girls first ski jump

ABOUT YOUR PRESENTER

matt headshot (2)Click here to learn more about Matt. Click here to see Matt’s book, Ditch That Textbook, on Amazon.

Matt Miller is available to present at your school or event! He presents to thousands of teachers all around the United States on a wide variety of technology and innovative instruction topics. See his “Work With Matt” page for more details.

Ditch That Homework

Reducing reliance on homework by being more effective and efficient

Find this page: DitchThatTextbook.com/homework

ditch that homework header

1. Start here: Quick survey on your feelings about homework …

CLICK HERE TO TAKE THE SURVEY

When you’re done, close the survey window and come back to this page.


2. Ditch That Homework book updates / Become a Ditch That Homework VIP

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP


3. Central questions

Why do we give homework?

Is homework effective?

What would class look like if giving homework wasn’t an option?

How can we make that scenario actually happen?


4. Research

John Hattie: 10 myths about student achievement

Excerpts from the article:

John Hattie’s 15 year meta-analysis of over ¼ of a billion students worldwide has enabled him to identify what really aids student achievement. In an interview with Sarah Montague for BBC Radio 4, he dispels some popular myths about what does and doesn’t matter in your school.

4. HomeworkHomework has been found to have no effect on the progress of primary school children. To get it right without getting rid of it, children at primary level should be given less projects and more activities that reinforce what they learnt in the lesson that day instead. Whilst homework does make more of a difference to secondary schoolchildren, too much emphasis is placed on it; 5-10 minutes of practising what was taught that day at school has the same effect as 1-2 hours does.


5. Ditch That Textbook (using technology to remix “textbook” activities and practices)

Screencastify (record screen and webcam) — screencastify.com

Create eye-catching infographics with Google Drawings — drawings.google.com/create


6. Ditch That Red Pen (providing timely, useful feedback that students can really use)

Quizizz (game show-style review and formative assessment) — quizizz.com


7. Ditch That Resistance (communicating with parents to build mutual understanding and support)

Remind (send text message reminders to parents, students … anyone) — remind.com

Social media (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, etc.)


8. Ditch That Referral (building relationships with students that pay dividends for everyone)

Every kid needs a champion (Rita Pierson) via TED: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SFnMTHhKdkw

“The most important thing I can do as a teacher is sit next to a kid.” — Alice Keeler (@alicekeeler)


9. Ditch That Lecture (getting kids connected to content and learning in new ways)

Ideas for giving choice in class:

  • Topic
  • Source for gathering information
  • How to demonstrate learning
  • Peer interaction (i.e. face to face, through comments, blogs, etc.)
  • Difficulty level

10. What do we do now?

PROGRESS. Make steps in the direction of your goals. Don’t expect everything to change immediately.

“We’re going to have to go through a middle phase before we go to no homework.” — Jon Corippo (@jcorippo)


 

Ditch That Textbook workshop (Madison Consolidated Schools)

Find this page at: DitchThatTextbook.com/Madison

Twitter full content in safe zone

Free stuff from Matt!

101 Practical Ways to Ditch That Textbook This ebook is packed with tips, tricks and ideas that will help you teach with technology, creativity and innovation — with less reliance on the textbook. It has tons of ideas you can start using in the classroom tomorrow!

Great Google stuff

street-view animatedGoogle Maps Street ViewStreet View makes it possible to drop your classroom virtually onto almost any street in the world and walk around. It uses panoramic images that let you turn around, zoom in and walk down roads to check out the scenery. Just grab the little yellow “peg man” and drop him where you’d like to go. For practice, try dropping yourself at your doorstep of your school if you’ve never used it before.

Street View Treks Once you’ve seen your school from the curb on Google Maps Street View, take it to the next level with Street View Treks. These custom-produced exploration experiences are awesome for students. They provide information about the location and videos that pair nicely with the panoramic views. Locations include Nepal, Gombe National Park, the Pyramids of Giza, the Great Barrier Reef (a Street View Trek underwater!) and more.

Custom maps — MyMaps lets students drop pins on their own maps and add all sorts of information to them, giving them data-rich, media-rich custom maps. Check out this post with lots of ways to use MyMaps in the classroom. Or see the example below!

Shared presentations — Create a presentation with one slide per student and give students permission to edit it. Then assign an activity — some quick Internet research, a writing prompt, an image search to find an example, etc. When they’re done, show the presentation on a projector. It’s student work instantly on display.

Practice with the shared presentation below:

0 stop action NMJ baker TRUNCATEDAnimation — This is a great hack (i.e. non-traditional use) of Google Slides that could take some time to complete but yield amazing results. Check out this video, where the creators made an impressive animation with 450 slides in a Google Slides presentation just by clicking through the slides quickly.

Google Drawings interactive posters — Google Drawings are great for bringing images, text and shapes together. Those elements combine for a great digital poster. But these digital posters are way better than a regular one made of poster board. Various elements in the poster can be clicked, delivering webpages and other online content to viewers.

annotate image google drawings (1)Photo comic strips — Take photos of students using a webcam and add them to a Google Drawing. Add speech bubbles to the photos. Then save those images and add each one to a different slide in a Google Slides presentation. Here’s a Google Site about Comics with Google Tools and Creativity Games for examples and more details.

Annotate images — A picture is, of course, worth a thousand words, but it can also teach important lessons. Let students manipulate that picture, and they can create meaning and own those lessons. Add an image to a Google Drawing and let students add text boxes and arrows, pointing out various parts of the photo that are of interest to the class.

hyperdocs frameworkHyperdocs — Hyperdocs are a hub for student-led learning and creating in a lesson or unit. In a Hyperdoc, students go top to bottom through a self-paced lesson. They gather necessary information, create using what they’ve learned and share with classmates. Teachers set up Hyperdocs by linking from the document they’re created in out to other Google files and websites that students can interact with.

The beauty of Hyperdocs is that there are lots of pre-created templates. Plus, there’s lots of guidance in creating them. The pedagogy behind them is a hybrid of several successful learning models. The creators of Hyperdocs (Lisa Highfill, Sarah Landis and Kelly Hilton) blended those models to give you an plug-and-play approach to engaging digital learning.

Check out the basic framework and learning model of a Hyperdoc in this document.

 

Great free tech tools

formative commentInstant, meaningful feedback with Formative (goformative.com) — Ever get frustrated with student papers that end up in the trash? All that feedback you wrote feels like it went to waste. It might be because students didn’t get the feedback fast enough to apply it.

Formative lets you shorten that feedback loop. Create digital assignments with questions (short answer, multiple choice, draw your answer, etc.), images, videos, and more. Then watch as students work on it in real time and give them feedback they can see immediately.

stackup reportsKeep track of student reading with Stackup (stackup.net) — There’s a TON of material to read on the Internet. Students read plenty online. There has to be some way to tie them together academically, right?

Stackup keeps track of what students are reading and how long they’re reading it. It displays statistics and charts for teachers and students, showing what topics they’ve been reading about and reading time. It even suggests new sites for students to check out based on their interests. Students can earn badges and even compete with friends.

  • The Stackup Chrome extension makes it easy to log reading while using a Google Chrome browser on a computer or Chromebook. (Note: You need a Stackup account to use it.)

quizizz-presentation-3-638Assess and review with a game show using Quizizz (quizizz.com) and Kahoot! (getkahoot.com) — You probably already know about Kahoot! — the formative assessment tool that turns reviewing into a game show. There are likely some features you don’t know about, though, like the new Jumble Kahoot! game, the blind Kahoot! to introduce new content, and duplicating other Kahoot! games so you can change them.

Quizizz is very similar to Kahoot!, but with a couple twists. Instead of displaying the question and possible answers on the screen, Quizizz puts everything on the student device. This lets the student decide the pace and leads to less frustration over malfunctioning tech. Quizizz also displays fun memes to show whether you got the answer right or wrong.


Contact Matt

Matt headshotIf you have questions for Matt or just want to bounce an idea off him, feel free to contact him.

Email: matt@DitchThatTextbook.com
Twitter: twitter.com/jmattmiller
Twitter hashtag: #DitchBook (twitter.com/hashtag/ditchbook)
Facebook: facebook.com/DitchThatTextbook
YouTube: youtube.com/DitchThatTextbook

Other projects

Matt’s book, Ditch That Textbook (available on Amazon in paperback and for Kindle)

Ditch That Homework, an upcoming book by Matt Miller and Alice Keeler

The Ditch That Textbook Digital Summit, a free online conference in December

The Google Teacher Tribe Podcast, a podcast by Matt Miller and Kasey Bell for using Google tools in the classroom

Ditch That Textbook’s Best of 2016

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Wow. The end of 2016. The education scene has seen a continued push in several big areas. Google Apps (now called G Suite), the maker movement and design thinking didn’t start in 2016, but they’ve grown bigger and bigger in 2016. 3D printing, drones, virtual reality and augmented reality have slowly crept into classrooms all […]