10 Jamboard templates for distance learning

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G Suite | Wednesday, July 15, 2020

10 Jamboard templates for distance learning

10 Jamboard Templates for Distance Learning
10 Jamboard Templates for Distance Learning

This post has 10 engaging ideas for using Jamboard in your class that will get your students working together, even though they may not be face to face.

This post is written by Kris Szajner, a tech integration specialist and former kindergarten teacher Prior Lake, Minnesota. You can follow him on Twitter @kszajner and check out his website kszajner.com.

Have you heard of Jamboard? It creates whiteboards that are a lot like slides. Looking for more collaborative activities to complete during distance learning? Look no further! 

This free Google tool isn't just about expensive interactive displays. 

Don't I need an expensive interactive display board to use it?

Nope! You can use the app for free on any device! It works with Google Drive and allows you to present your whiteboard to people viewing remotely. Which makes it a great online whiteboard option for distance learning.

What is Jamboard?

With Jamboard you can:

  • Add sticky notes, drawings, images, text and more.
  • Search Google and insert images or webpages.
  • Move images, texts, notes and drawings around on the screen easily.
  • Drag and resize text and images with your fingers.
  • Share your "jams" with others and let them collaborate. 

Getting started with Jamboard

The Google Teacher Center has some great resources for educators looking to get started using Jamboard in your classroom.

Resources include:

  • a video library or tutorials 
  • tips and trick from teachers 
  • PDF guides 
  • lesson plans and more


10 Jamboard Templates for Distance Learning

1. Two Truths and a Fib

Start your year off right with a great get to know you game. Use this template to have students share about themselves in a fun and collaborative platform.

 

Pro tip: This template works best if each student has their own sheet.

2. Guess Who

Guess who is a great game where students can share more about themselves. This can also be used for reflecting on book characters, sharing about numbers, or simply discussing different strategies. Extend the learning far beyond the traditional “Guess Who” game. This template works best if each student has their own sheet.

Pro Tip - Be sure students are not signed into Google and you have the permissions set to “anyone with the link is an Editor”. This will ensure that each student is anonymous! 

3. Good, OK, Bad

This page is a perfect way to check in with students. Using this will help you to know about where your students are at and allow you the opportunity to follow up with any issues. Now more than ever, it is important to be mindful of our students social emotional health! This template works best if you complete their activity as a class.

4. Thumbs up, thumbs down

This is another version of a check in that you can use with students. It is a much quicker way to gauge your class and is a great piggy back on a strategy or a lesson that you taught. Simply teach your lesson and then exit with this slip to close up any misconceptions before you move on. This template works best if you complete their activity as a class.

5. Fist to Five

This engagement strategy is a multi use check in. You can use it at the beginning of a lesson and then have students move their post it as the lesson closes up. It helps students to gauge their understanding, or emotional health, on a deeper level than yes/no, good/ok/bad. This template works best if you complete their activity as a class.

6. Graffiti Wall

A Graffiti Wall is a phenomenal check in that is focused on art. Students collaborate on the wall to create a mural of thoughts of feelings. This in turn can instantly transfer into a study guide for all learners. This template works best if you complete their activity as a class.

7. Four Corners

Four corners is exactly what you think it is. Pose a question for students with 4 potential answers or responses. Allow students to move a sticky note or write their name in the spot they feel is correct. After that, be sure to discuss why you chose that spot (this is often the most right part of this strategy). This template works best if you complete their activity as a class.

8. Stop and Sketch

Just as above, the name says it all. Stopping your learning and doing a quick skitch allows students to affirm their thinking and also discuss any misconceptions before you move on. Ask a few students to share their drawings from the canvas but ask that all students write or draw something down. This template works best if you complete their activity as a class.

Pro tip: Be sure students zoom into the canvas. This will make writing or drawing WAY easier!

9. Jot Spot

Similar to the Stop and Sketch, students have a space that is theirs. Instead of drawing something down, you can ask them to respond to a prompt. Pose a question or have them reflect on the learning. They can use their parking spot to write or draw their thoughts down. This template works best if you complete their activity as a class.

Pro tip: Be sure students zoom into the canvas. This will make writing or drawing WAY easier!

10. Three Things

What are the three things that stood out to you the most? What three questions do you still have? Pose a question like this to students and allow them to use their space to write three things that stuck with them. This template works best if each student has their own sheet.

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  • […] Also check out a version of Guess Who on Jamboard (#2 in this post) […]

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