Free ebook: “The Digital PIRATE,” tech and PIRATE teaching

So, I made something for you. I hope you like it!

Dave Burgess’s book “Teach Like a PIRATE” has been an eye-opener for me and countless other teachers around the planet. The book demonstrates how to use passion and the art of performance to create unforgettable learning experiences. It includes my favorite part, hooks — practical ideas you can implement in class immediately that can boost student engagement.

I took on “The 30 Day Pirate Challenge,” where I tried to incorporate something from the book each day to engage, inspire and entertain my students. In the ensuing reflection post, I shared my successes and failures (yes, there were both!).

As I dig deeper into the book, the techie teacher geek in me keeps asking, “How could technology take these ideas to the next level?”

Or, another way to phrase it: “How could I become a digital pirate teacher?” (No, I’m not talking about pirating digital music!)

After some brainstorming, I’ve compiled 20 teaching ideas that incorporate an engagement hook from “Teach Like a PIRATE” and a free digital tool.

Tech integration + PIRATE teaching = exciting learning!

I’ve described a few of the ideas in this post. To download the entire ebook for FREE, click the image of the book to the right (or just click here)! (If you’re signed up for my e-mail updates, check your e-mail for a link to download the ebook.)

1.Using the Backwards Hook with WeVideo — The Backwards Hook is about showing students the end before explaining how it happened. Think of movies or TV shows that show the aftermath of destruction or a character in a tight spot. Then the rest of the show explains how it all happened. WeVideo allows users to create video projects with text, images and video clips. Create a short video introduction to show students the end first, piquing their interest for a discussion or activity.

2. Using the Board Message Hook with PowToon — The Board Message Hook suggests that a provocative, attention-grabbing message written on the board can engage students before class even starts. Creating an animated “board message” (video) can do that in a flashy way. PowToon makes creating customized animated videos easy. Play one to start class to get everyone’s attention!

3. Using the Mime Hook with Gone Google Story Builder — Using silence or written messages is what the Mime Hook is all about. Gone Google Story Builder allows users to create a video that looks like people are typing messages to each other in a Google document. Those written words could set the stage for a lesson or punctuate it at the end. Type the words and generate a link that anyone can view later.

There are 17 more hook + tech activities in the “The Digital PIRATE” ebook. Click here to get your copy and check it out!

What are some other ideas you have for integrating PIRATE hooks and technology use in the classroom? Share your thoughts in a comment below!

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9 thoughts on “Free ebook: “The Digital PIRATE,” tech and PIRATE teaching

  1. You are just ever so creative!!! I love how you embrace learning and all the passion and fulfillment that comes with it. What a fantastic idea. I can’t wait to see all the ideas you came up with!!! Also, your drawing…LOVE!! arrrrg (sorry could help myself)

  2. This is insane! Our school mascot is a pirate. I was just reading the book Teach Like a Pirate and was thinking I would do a presentation on Tech like a pirate. I am an instructional tech. specialist for my district. I was looking for material when I found this. This is so awesome, I can’t wait to look at it. Thank you for creating this.

  3. Good Morning,

    I subscribe to your newsletter, but I can’t see to find the link to download “Tech Like a Pirate” ebook. It will not allow me to download from your site. Would you please help me?

    Thanks
    Pam Cadwalder